7 stunning Nottinghamshire bridges you can walk or cycle across

There are bridges to be found all over Nottinghamshire, including some purpose-built for walking or cycling across picturesque settings like country parks.

Others are railway viaducts built more than a century ago that are now only open to cyclists and walkers.

The county has many of these bridges, and they are all open to the public for visiting free of charge.

Nottinghamshire Live has compiled a list of seven of the best bridges in the county you can enjoy a walk or cycle across.

Images of the Ornamental Bridge at Clumber Park before and after its restoration.

Ornamental Bridge – Clumber Park

This bridge in the country park in Worksop was only reopened last year after repairs.

The Ornamental Bridge at the National Trust country park had many of its railings and balusters destroyed in March 2018, with an abandoned, burnt out car left next to the damage.

Now closed to walkers, the bridge is still open to walkers and cyclists.

The bridge forms part of a walking and cycling route around Clumber Park that is more than 3 miles in total.

Fledborough Viaduct

Fledborough Viaduct is a former railway viaduct near Fledborough, Nottinghamshire, which is now part of the national cycle network.

Fledborough Viaduct (Mat Fascione)

Built in 1897, the viaduct closed to rail travel in 1980

Today the railway track running east from the site of Fledborough station through North Clifton to Doddington & Harby forms an off-road part of National Cycle Route 647.

From Harby onwards through the site of Skellingthorpe almost to Pyewipe Junction the viaduct forms an off-road part of National Cycle Route 64.

Gunthorpe Bridge

The Gunthorpe Bridge we know today was built around 1926.
The Gunthorpe Bridge we know today was built around 1926 after the previous iron structure was demolished.
(Image: Joseph Raynor/ Nottingham Post)

At the village of Gunthorpe, a bridge stretches across the River Trent.

The current bridge was built in 1927, 400 metres upstream from the old one, with new bypass roads for Gunthorpe and East Bridgford village.

It is open to cyclists and has walking paths on each side.

Trent Bridge

Trent Bridge is looking even more impressive given its recent paint job.

Trent Bridge, with a view to Nottingham Forest's City Ground
Trent Bridge, with a view to Nottingham Forest’s City Ground

Historically the gateway into the city from the south, this bridge crosses over the River Trent and is still used by countless commuters today.

It is an iron and stone road bridge built in 1871.

The bridge was designed by Marriott Ogle Tarbotton and was completed at a cost of £30,000 (equivalent to £2,813,922 as of 2019).

Cyclists can make use of the bridge and so can pedestrians crossing over either side.

The statue of Sir Robert Clifton near Wilford Toll Bridge, which he built 150 years ago.

Wilford Toll Bridge

Wilford Toll Bridge was originally opened as a toll bridge for general traffic in 1870, but was closed when declared unsafe in 1974.

Following the demolition of the central span, a narrower footbridge and cycleway was opened in 1980.

The bridge was again widened to accommodate an extension of the NET tram network in 2015.

Parts of the northern side of the bridge are Grade II listed, including the former toll house.

King’s Mill Viaduct, near Mansfield
(Image: Denis Hill)

King’s Mill Viaduct

A railway viaduct in Nottinghamshire built more than 200 years ago is the oldest in England.

Mansfield’s King’s Mill Viaduct was built by Josiah Jesop in 1817 and was a ‘vital’ part of life in the town during the 1800s.

And it’s still used today, although not for the railway but as a public walkway.

The viaduct was first used by the Mansfield and Pinxton Railway line in 1819, but passenger services did not run across it until nearly 15 years later.

A swan pictured in bright sunshine on the River Trent near the Wilford Suspension Bridge in Victoria Embankment, Nottingham
A swan pictured in bright sunshine on the River Trent near the Wilford Suspension Bridge in Victoria Embankment, Nottingham
(Image: Joseph Raynor/ Nottingham Post)

Wilford Suspension Bridge

This bridge plays a more vital role around the city than some may realise.

Originally known as the Welbeck Suspension Bridge, Wilford Suspension Bridge is a footbridge aqueduct, and also carries a gas main.

It links West Bridgford to the Meadows and was originally built in 1908 before it was rebuilt in 2010.

The bridge is owned by Severn Trent Water meaning there is no public right of way along the bridge, and so it can be closed by Severn Trent Water whenever it is deemed necessary to do so.


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